Friday, August 23, 2019
News, analysis and commentary by UBC Journalism students


Stunt Double

Mark Malkoff  lived my dream. The New York City comedian moved into some sweet new digs earlier this month. While…

By Amy Hadley , in Blogs Consumerland , on January 30, 2008

Mark Malkoff  lived my dream.

The New York City comedian moved into some sweet new digs earlier this month.

While his permanent pad was being de-roached, this swinging city slicker took a little vacation in a New Jersey Ikea.

Wow! The generosity of that friendly Swedish giant is really something else!

You know, I think I remember a time when targeting people or products for comedic stunts sparked reactions of outrage. Maybe even a good old fashioned restraining order.

I think I do, but I also think that I remember a terrifying birthday party for an early childhood friend at which an adult dressed up in a giant ALF costume made me cry.  I may have made it up. I’m skeptical that costumes of the bizarre T.V. alien were ever even made; but there’s no chance I’ll forget that scarring experience, fabricated or not.

Anyone who watches Malkoff’s antics probably won’t forget the images of Ikea anytime soon, and the purveyors of fine furnishings didn’t have to pay a cent for that advertising (or the advertising here, for that matter).

These days political figures line up to be lambasted by comedians. Companies clamour for opportunities like the golden one to allow a temporarily displaced dude with a camera to jump on their show couches for a week.

Before YouTube, this symbiotic relationship was one to be enjoyed by already established comedic celebrity. Now the opportunities to accost the rich, famous and corporate are more equal than ever before.

So people like Malkoff, or maybe even ordinary folk like – dare I say – me can live the dream too!

What? Sorry, no I didn’t mean that my dream is to make my name through hilarious stunts.

My lifelong aspiration is to shack up in a department store.

Yep, I never really grew out of that fantasy.

And a girl can dream, can’t she?