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'Bedkit' boosts sleep for poor kids

Mat. Ground sheet. Pillow. Mosquito net. Pyjamas. These are the items found in ‘bedkits’ that are distributed by Sleeping Children…

By Monica Tanaka , in Insomniac , on February 5, 2009 Tags: , , , ,

Mat. Ground sheet. Pillow. Mosquito net. Pyjamas.

These are the items found in ‘bedkits’ that are distributed by Sleeping Children Around the World to kids in 31 developing countries.

This year, the Canadian charity has helped its millionth child get a better night’s sleep despite the harsh conditions he or she lives in.

I’d like to think that the strong support it gets from Canadian donors translates into a national belief in the importance of sleep.

Finally, sleep climbs the healthcare ladder!

Sleeping Children Around the World has a unique approach to improve sleep, which as I’ve mentioned in previous posts, is linked to certain health factors.

But why bedkits?

The premise of Sleeping Children Around the World is very simple. Its founder, Murray Dryden believed that a safe, good night sleep is a basic right that every child should have.

“Murray Dryden knew how vital a few hours of comfort and sleep could be to help one forget the extremes of temperature, the hopelessness, the sickness, and the pangs of hunger” —www.scaw.org

With that founding principle, Dryden’s charity has raised over $20 million for bedkits since 1970. Each kit costs about CND$35 and is made in the country where it will be distributed.

It’s a noble act that’s outlived Murray Dryden. His descendants are now carrying the torch. In two weeks ‘Team Dryden’ will set forth on a trip to the orphanage in Pune, India that inspired Murray to start the charity.

And while some critics might say that the money would be better spent on food or prescription drugs, bedkits are just one example of the measures that need to be taken to relieve world poverty.

Here’s to Team Dryden.